psychotherapy

Surviving the Break-Up

 

After the Breakup : Women Sort Through the Rubble and Rebuild Lives of New Possibilities, Angela Watrous, Carole Honeychurch After the Breakup : Women Sort Through the Rubble and Rebuild Lives of New Possibilities      by Angela Watrous, Carole Honeychurch "This book was a life-saver for me. I would highly recommend it to anyone going through a painful breakup. I bought a bunch of self-help books when my breakup happened, and this was far and away the most helpful, insightful, comforting book of all. The authors did a wonderful job with interviewing a wide array of women going through the same pain. When you feel like the only one in the world feeling the way you do, it's great to know that you're not alone. This is one of the most helpful books I've ever read. Buy it, read it, and feel like you'll actually survive the breakup."

 


Surviving the Breakup : How Children and Parents Cope With Divorce, Judith S. Wallerstein, Joan Berlin Kelly Surviving the Breakup : How Children and Parents Cope With Divorce      by Judith S. Wallerstein, Joan Berlin Kelly (Contributor) "Based on the Children of Divorce Project, the landmark study of how children, adolescents and their parents cope during the first five years after a family dissolution, Surviving the Breakup revolutionized the way society thought about divorce. Among other things, its findings showed how the adjustment of the child depends more on what happens after the divorce than on conditions in the predivorce family, that the father-child relationship does not diminish in importance regardless of how infrequent their contact becomes and that the child's anger and yearnings can last for an extraordinarily long time.
Written by undisputed authorities on the subject, this work started the debate about divorce and the family, a subject that has since become one of the most important issues in today's political arena. It is a text that all Americans concerned with family values should read."

50 Ways to Love Your Leaver: Getting on With Your Life After the Breakup (Rebuilding Books), Dwight Webb Ph.D.50 Ways to Love Your Leaver: Getting on With Your Life After the Breakup (Rebuilding Books)      by Dwight Webb Ph.D. "Dr. Webb's personal journey becomes a practical guide for those seeking to survive the loss of a love. His sensitive and compassionate style offers hope and encouragement to those in deep despair as they grieve the ending of an intimate relationship. Practical, helpful exercises, "how-to" procedures; Expert guidance; Combines professional expertise with personal experience; Brief, readable, warm and friendly style."

The Breakup Book, Monica SheehanThe Breakup Book      by Monica Sheehan "This little guide for women who are trying to survive the first month after a breakup advocates some behaviors that may get you in trouble. But hey, if you know you're not going to be able to stop yourself from driving by your ex's house or calling his answering machine just to hear his voice, you may as well get them over with and get to the serious stuff. Down yet another bag of Mallomars; live through that nasty hangover; and move through the requisite phases of denial, depression, revenge fantasies, shopping sprees, and a new, drastically different haircut. You'll inevitably come to the conclusion that you're better off without him. Should you ever need reminding and emotional support (and your friends are thoroughly sick of hearing your whining and play-by-play report of your relationship's failure), turn to this book for strength."

 

He Loved Me, He Loves Me Not; A Guide to Fudge, Fury, Free Time, and Life Beyond the Breakup, Lynn Harris, Chris KalbHe Loved Me, He Loves Me Not; A Guide to Fudge, Fury, Free Time, and Life Beyond the Breakup      by Lynn Harris, Chris Kalb (Illustrator) "Welcome to Splitsville, Population 3: You, Ben, and Jerry. He Loved Me, He Loves Me Not is your guide to surviving a breakup with dignity, humor, and even your stuff. It's also the literary birthplace of the superstar/superhero of the Internet and television, Breakup Girl -- who saves love lives the world over."

Mars and Venus Starting over : A Practical Guide for Finding Love Again After a Painful Breakup, Divorce, or the Loss of a Loved One, John Gray Mars and Venus Starting over : A Practical Guide for Finding Love Again After a Painful Breakup, Divorce, or the Loss of a Loved One      by John Gray "The book is wonderfully helpful in reaffirming the absolute normality of anger, depression, fear, and sorrow of a painful divorce, breakup, or loss. It's nice to know that it's OK to feel everything and nothing all at once. From the moment I began to read the pages I felt better. Now I that Dr. Gray has helped me discover the problems, I can tackle them and overcome them and learn how to love and be loved better."
Also in  Hardcover
    Audio Cassette    (Abridged), Large Print   

 

Boundaries    by Henry Cloud, John Townsend "I have worked as a jail chaplain for almost twenty years and this book has been both an inspiration and a clarifier. Not only is it important for me to set clear boundaries in the work place with inmates, but because of the nature of the work on my personal life, I've needed to set countless boundaries in my relationship with people who don't understand my love and concern for the incarcerated. I have asked all of my volunteers to read the book also because we've used it as a teaching tool for inmates, most of whom have never learned how to set boundaries. We have found it most helpful in dealing with battered and abused women, as well as those needing anger management. Because the text is filled with biblical principles, I believe it is in line with what God chooses for us, but allows us to make the choice for ourselves. Personally, I also have children and grandchildren and I'm using the guidelines to create a place of harmony in my home. Thank you, Drs. Cloud and Townsend for giving us a user friendly guide to boundaries and the happiness they give."

 

Party of One: The Loners' Manifesto    by Anneli S. Rufus "Rufus's achievement in "Party of One" is to boldly challenge one of the most widely held assumptions: being alone is inevitably bad, a sign of illness and lack of social skill. For loners, solitude is simply a different way of living life, one which keeps sane those of us who find socializing exhausting.

Rufus challenges the media's automatic assumption that all serial killers are "loners" (demonstrably false) or that solitary children are bound to get into serious trouble (many of histories greatest geniuses and artists have been solitary souls). Rufus can write well and I applaud her for devoting much time to proudly thinking about solitude and defending those who rather be left alone.

 

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